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"To Revolutionary Type Love - appropriation and other practices" – Ausstellung und Symposium

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Appropriation is making use of the world in changing the world. It can
be a Revolutionary Type Love. Appropriation can be corporate power
turning culture into capital, or it can be queer art turning
heteronormative structure inside out. It is the potential and inevitable
condition of any expression - but under conditions of huge inequalities.
We look at art and media, at cultural appropriation and other practices.

The group exhibition presents contemporary art works from the African
continent around the topic of queer life in Kenya and beyond through
experimental, documentary and collective formats, using the media of
photography and textile (kanga). Three members of the group – Kawira
Mwirichia (kanga), Malcolm Muga and Faith Wanjala (photography) – come
to Braunschweig to present the exhibition. Opening on Wednesday 13th of
June, with an introduction and artist's talk at 5 pm, followed by a
sound performance around 'Black beats' by Johannes Ismaiel-Wendt and
Malte Pelleter, at the gallery of HBK Braunschweig, Johannes Selenka
Platz 1, 38118 Braunschweig.

The next days, the symposium discusses appropriation strategies both
from the mainstream as well as empowerment tactics of minoritised
positions in media, the arts, queer and postcolonial issues. Panels
focus contemporary art in Africa, Black queer activism, Black activism
in Germany, in their mediated and political specificities.
Guests: Henriette Gunkel, Samanea Karrfalt, Nana Adusei-Poku, Maisha Auma Eggers, Katja Kinder, Awino Okech, Stacie Graham, Nadine Siegert, mahlOt Sansoa.
Thursday, June 14th, 10-20 h; Friday, June 15th, 10-12 h.
Venue: Aula of HBK Braunschweig, Johannes Selenka Platz 1, 38118
Braunschweig.

Organisers: Ulrike Bergermann and Rena Onat.
Funding by Pro.Niedersachsen and HBK Braunschweig, in cooperation with
Iwalewa-Haus for Contemporary African Art, University of Bayreuth.